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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
the approaching fiscal cliff but there's a looming deadline that could have a huge impact on the economy. >> a strike involving dock workers could happen this weekend. linda so is live at federal hill and linda this could be affecting us on down the road. >> reporter: we have the port of baltimore generating lots of money and jobs. but the longshoremen thousands of them if they go on strike sunday, everything all of the cargo that comes through the port will be affected. the stuff that's in the containers are clothes toys electronics. just to give you perspective here, 55 billion dollars worth of cargo is handled in an average month by ports on the east and gulf coast. so if a deal can't be reached by saturday, thousands of dock workers will be walking off the job sunday morning. and at issue are the large containers and the payments longshoremen get. shipping companies pay royalties to dock workers for the containers based on the weight. but they want to get rid of the royalties something longshoremen are not willing to give up. and if an agreement cannot be reached the economic impact
to reach a deal with poison u.s. consumer spending. the fiscal cliff would trigger tax increases and government spending cuts in january, leaving far less money in the economy. the international monetary fund warrants of knock on effects for the global economy. -- warns of knock on effects for the global economy. the pressure is on in washington to agree on a plan. only then might the applause on wall street be a little more genuine. >> with the clock ticking ever more loudly in washington, let's bring in our correspondent. first off, are the prospects of an agreement as dim as we are hearing, or could there be a last-minute deal? then of course this could happen, but i think it is quite unlikely. there is an increased pessimism that a deal can be achieved in washington, d.c. from my perspective, i think washington moves too slowly. tax rates will go for all americans, and cuts will go into effect by the end of this year, and we will see no more unemployment benefits for about 2 million americans. >> there are some technicalities here. what are the government's contingency plans?
of $100 billion last year. as the u.s. economy moves rapidly toward falling off the fiscal cliff, president obama is about to give a final push. negotiating with congressional leaders from both political parties. from the democrat-controlled senate, top democrat harry reid, and the top republican mitch mcconnell. senator reid says there is no time to reach a deal. mr. mcconnell says he is more optimistic. then from the republican controlled house of representatives, the top republican john boehner has rejected president obama's previous offers and the morse -- most senior democrat in the house, nancy pelosi. what is the cliff and can be avoided? >> the house of representatives will be going back into session sunday but at this point we do not know what kind of measure they have before them that they can consider for a vote. there has been no indication from the white house or the republican leadership that they are anywhere near any kind of makings of a deal that they could present to the house republican leadership -- or the house republican rank-and-file who so far have been ad
have a huge impact on our economy just when it's most vulnerable to the approaching fiscal cliff. business groups and state leaders are now calling on the president to intervene, warning that a strike could really cost the country billions of dollars. if history is any indication, those warnings may be dead on. a lockout on the west coast back in 2002, remember that? lasted a total of ten days, and it cost the economy an estimated $1 billion each and every day. >>> a strike at the ports of los angeles and long beach earlier this month lasted eight days, an estimated loss of $650 million a day. a republican strategist and a former campaign aide for president george w. bush, julie roginsky is former political adviser to new jersey senate frank lautenberg. good to see you both. >> good to see you. gregg: didi, smoot-holly was passed decades ago for the purpose of putting tariff limits on incoming products. do we need to reexplore that? >> yeah. this was, this was back in the '60s. i mean, this was ancient history. why should these workers who get paid very well also get on top of th
debt ceiling. you think the fiscal cliff thing is bad for the economy. you wait and see if they can't get the debt ceiling worked out. >> right. it's one thing to go over the fiscal cliff. that would be bad. we don't want to it happen. a recession may happen. it would be unfortunate. it's different than the u.s. defaulting on the debt. you know, we saw that back in august, 2011, we saw the downgrade of the credit rating. just by having the threat of not approving the debt ceiling increase and the possibility of default. it comes around again at the end of february, beginning of march. it's a time when there's a deal. if the deal does not include the debt ceiling, more damaging effects on the confidence. >> here we go again. neil irwin, it's good. economic editor. three ways they can mess this thing up next year. thank you so much. we'll talk to you again soon. we are 20 minutes to the top of the hour now. there have been major setbacks in the deal talks. we are just getting this news, a major setback in negotiations over a fiscal cliff deal. senator reid, according to democratic sou
. that is being discussed as part of a fiscal cliff deal but money believe that will hurt the economy and giving a disincentive to invest money. is that just focused on the real wealthy? >> i hear that argument a lot. number one, i'm really tired of our tax policy decisions and everything being made by what the market is going to do in the next quarter. look, this is an aberration and the tax code and grossly unfair. you look at say they raise tax rates, the top tax rate to 39.6% for those making more than $500,000, that's going to mean a lot of small businesses are going to pay that nearly 40% marginal tax rate where you have billionaire private equity funds paying 15, 20 or even 24 depending on where they put it. not an issue of penalizing investment income but penalizing labor and those who make their income through wages and they should both be taxed at the same rate. i do, again, fundam and at least raising the capital gains rate would help address this anomaly and susan collins and clara mccasical give legitimate -- you have billionaire equity managers paying 39%. i think this is a source
budget deficit. >> the japanese fiscal cliff will be larger than the one in the united states, because japan's financial burden is considerably heavier than the other developed nations. in order for japan to put its fiscal house in order to, japan is launching a tax hike soon. there's one important condition for japan to do that. that is to observe stable growth by the time the taxes will be raised. this government, it has to be eager to boost its economy so that you can see an uptick of growth in the first half of next year. >> toyota is having its largest ever safety crisis, but it will cost more than a billion dollars. japanese automakers selling with customers in the u.s. will say that their vehicle suddenly exploded for no reason. about 16 million vehicles were sold between 1998 and 2010. investors are relieved the payout was not even bigger. shares ended the day a little in tokyo. -- up a little. israeli-arab politician is appealing to the supreme court after she was barrestole the american dream, thursday, 30 eastern, 7:00 p.m. pacific. >> welcome back. a reminder of our top sto
's put the economy over politics here. >> because the whole fiscal cliff which is a manufactured cliff essentially by both houses of congress happened because they tried to do that last year and said let's give ourselves another arbitrary deadline. you know six months from now we will be right back where we started from. that is the problem. >> laura: we are are almost out of time. but the democratic senate refuses to pass a budget. won't do it. can't do it. the president couldn't get a sing the vote for his own budget. the idea he is going to rush in from vacation and be the caped crusader rescuing us all from fiscal doom is absurd. a razzle dazzle spin move. even matt damon is giving up. >> that is just -- that is the most depress end to a segment i have h heard in my life. >> laura: we are out of time, guys. my goodness. someone has to lead at some point. >> i have my crash helmet on. we are going over the cliff. >> laura: next, a civil war among republicans in congress. will speaker benito survive the revolt? and later, president obama in the next four years. what will his second t
. state department says it is willing to talk more about keeping the children safe. >>> fiscal cliff isn't the only threat to the u.s. economy. get a load of this. the container cliff. nearly 15,000 dockworkers from maryland to texas are threatening to strike, starting sunday, which could shut down more than a dozen key shipping ports and cripple commerce across the country. dock on workers are demanding higher container royalties to boost their pay. >>> did the newtown school shooter have an evil gene? scientists at the university of connecticut will study adam lanza's dna to see if a mutation or ab normality could have made him more violent? this is the first study of its kind on a mass killer. >>> jockeying started for john kerry's senate seat, even before it's vacant. massachusetts congressman ed markey throwing his hat into the ring in kerry becomes secretary of state, which is expected, a special election will be held early this summer. markey is the first prominent candidate to declare for the race. >>> love this story. paying it forward by paying it backward. a story of rampant g
. lawmakers are taking this country over the fiscal cliff. as one senator said today, something has gone terribly wrong when the biggest threat to our economy is our congress. let's get right to abc's chief white house correspondent jon karl covering this every step of the way. jon, many angry americans watching all of this. >> reporter: well, david, they just blew it. it is now clear that congress will fail to pass by midnight tonight something to prevent virtually everybody's taxes from going up. they have known for more than a year that tonight was the deadline and they just blew it. the deadline to prevent that massive $600 billion combination of tax hikes and spending cuts will be missed. but the scramble continues. to try to get a deal done and passed over the next day or two, that would put the tax cuts, at least, back in place retro actively. and today, they sure seemed close to a deal. >> i can report that we've reached an agreement on all of the tax tsh -- the tax issue. >> reporter: and even though the deal was not finalized, the president seemed to take a victory lap today at
the fiscal cliff, the fiasco as well as the debt ceiling debacle. richard, how is this playing out? we understand richard is not here. we're going to talk to richard a little later about this. >>> eurovision, a singing competition, a lot like "american idol." it's popular, trendy, everybody's watching it. it launched the careers of abba and celine dion. now the radio show which is paid for by the countries that participate in it, it's now in trouble. the economy is to blame. here's our reporter. ♪ >> reporter: cheesy music. kitsch costumes. ♪ and national stereotypes. ♪ for 58 years, the eurovision song contest has united europeans in a celebration of music and at times laughter. ♪ but as countries struggle to meet budget targets, frills are starting to take a back seat. portugal, poland, slovakia and boz that herzegovina say they're pulling out of the competition because they can't afford to win. the czech republic and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms.
until we all go over the fiscal cliff which would mean everyone's taxes will go up and sharp spending cuts will go effect that could drive our economy back into recession. to abc news white house correspondent jonathan karl filling in today for george stephanopoulos as host of abc's "this week." >> hey, jon, good morning. i know today and tomorrow obviously hugely important. can you sort of walk us through the potential order of operations? what could we see play out today and tomorrow? >> well, it is right down to the wire, dan. what's happening right now is harry reid and mitch mcconnell, the top democrat and republican in the senate are still negotiating their staffs at this hour. they are supposed to be working until about 3:00 this afternoon when the plan would be presented to both caucuses. as we understand what they are talking about is the bare minimum. basically the senate negotiating to extend those tax cuts for everybody making under $250,000 a year and do extend unemployment benefits also they're talking about trying to do something to stop the automatic spending cuts that
of a fiscal cliff deal, but many believe that will end up hurting the economy, giving a disincentive to invest money? was that just focused on the real wealthy? >> i hear that argument a lot. number one is, i'm really tired of our tax policy decisions. you know, everything, being made by what the market's going to do in the next quarter. this is about aberration of the tax code and grossly unfair. say they raise top tax rate to 39.6% for those making more than $500,000. that means a lot of small businesses will are paying that nearly 40% marginal tax rate where you have billionaire private equity funds paying 15, 20, even 24, depending where they put it. it's not an issue of penalizing investment income. it's an issue of penalizing labor, and those who make their income through wages. both are legitimate and both should be taxed at the same rate. so i do -- again, fundamental tax reform could solve this problem, but at least raising the capital gains rate would help address this anomaly and susan collins and claire mccaskill have a proposal to try to give small business owners, legitimate smal
for their businesses, should they buy a new computer, hire new people, the fiscal cliff is damaging the economy today. >> juliet: what are they doing? they don't know what to do. you have to act the at a certain point. are they laying people or, are they not moving? >> it's minimalist, do the least amount you can do at this point in time until you know what your tax liability is going to be. until you know what the economic outlook's going be to be. are we going to have another recession. >> juliet: how is that affecting them by doing the least, the least type of movement, i guess you could say? >> many of my members are not giving out bonuses, they're freezing pay, not hiring. that's what's happening on the main street america. and the fiscal cliff impacted already and main street small businesses are feeling that impact. if we go over the cliff, of course, it will be exacerbated and even worse, starting on january 1, the payroll taxes start going up and the rest of us. i think most small businesses people are convinced nobody in washington has a clue how to run a business, how to balance the books,
that the government could per happen goes of that fiscal cliff. now, just five days until everyone's taxes go up in this country, how much for the average american family? here's our chief white house correspondent jon karl tonight. >> reporter: president obama cut short his hawaii vacation, running back to washington, where storm clouds, real storm clouds, are gathering over the capitol. instead of deal making, it's name calling. the top democrat in the senate, accusing the republican speaker of the house of running a dictatorship. they say they haven't given up, but it sure sounds that way. >> i don't know time wise how it can happen now. >> here we are, once again, at the end of the year, staring at a crisis we should have dealt with literally months ago. >> reporter: vice president biden made a rare appearance in the senate, not to negotiate -- >> i do. >> congratulations, senator. >> reporter: but to swear in a new democratic senator from hawaii. a vote the white house will need if the senate ever gets around to voting on a plan to avert the fiscal cliff. in the house, even less going on. t
. fiscal cliff crisis taking a toll on consumer confidence. putting things in context, here it is. a score of 90 on the conference board's index means the economy is healthy. last time we saw that number was 2007 before the start of the financial crisis. over the last two months we've seen steady declines. november's report showed a score of 71.5 and 65.1 in december. that is lowest number we've seen since august. joining us now for more on this is jonathan hunt, portfolio manager for capitalist pig hedge fund. contributor to for fox news channel, good to see you. >> happy new year. >> consumers have no faith in congress, guys get your act together. if there is a deal tomorrow, how do you think is this is going to affect consumer confidence over the next six months? >> it might slightly help but already there is a tremendous damage done. it's no surprise that consumers are not confident. to be confident you have to have some slight semblance of certainty and we haven't had anything like that. consumers want to think long term and budget but trillions of dollars and hundreds of millions of
. >>> also today is the final day of fiscal cliff negotiations. hope of reaching a wide-ranging deal in automatic spending increases and tax cuts is all but gone. spending would be reduced and cuts would be felt in all areas of the government. economies have warned that going over the cliff would cause a spike in unemployment and trigger another recession. this morning the senate reconvenes with the aim of reaching a smaller deal, one that might spare millions of americans from paying her taxes. danielle nottingham reporting now from washington. >> lawmakers are still working on it. >> i want everyo one to know i' willing to get this done but i need dance partner. >> the main sticking point between democrats and republicans continues to be over the threshold of tax increases. president obama campaigned on raising taxes on income over $250,000 while many congressional republicans have pushed back against any tax increases. president obama is placing the blame for the impasse on the gop. >> they say that their biggest priority is making sure that we deal with the deficit in a serious w
the fiscal cliff. our political panel is going to weigh in on the chances for a deal. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> the pressure is on as harry reid and mitch mcconnell race against the clock to find a fix to the fiscal cliff. joining me are cnn contributor and democratic strategist maria cardona and republican strategist ron bonjin. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> ron, i'll start with you. reid and mcconnell, they really are the focus in the senate. in the house, it's speaker john boehner. i've got to ask you, is his job on the line if republicans balk at any deal that's reached? >> no, not at all. speaker boehner is extremely strong. his conferences support him and knows that he's been in a tough position trying to negotiate the fiscal deal with the president. he's be
to see you. >> good morning. >> dave: it's funny, we're talking about the fiscal cliff stuff and jobs seem to be left out of the conversation. we haven't heard about much to jump start the economy. tell us what the jobs act is. >> first of all, the financing cliff, you can either raise taxes, cut spending or grow the economy. there has been very little discussion about growth. congress did something great and president obama signed it. it was called the jobs act. it was about growth and a lot of growth through innovation. what it did is made easier forebitt entwhistles to raise money. they could crowd funds, go out to more people before having these commission regulations, they could do many other things they couldn't do under the present law. but it did require the security and exchange commission to issue some rules. it turns out those rules have still not been issued. it's been about a year now and they've been held up because the chairman of the sec, chairwoman, shapiro, no relation to me, decided to sit on them because she was concerned about her legacy, according to some e-mails
starting to see very positive trends. >> clayton: let's talk about the fiscal cliff. 'cause a number of factors in play here, number one, capital gains taxes moving forward and we saw a lot of investments and a lot of investors buying up. are you from phoenix in that neck of the woods? >> no, i'm in washington. both d.c. and seattle. >> clayton: and some of those investments, even in the d.c. area, we saw some investments in the outlying areas, but phoenix of course, vegas. investors coming in and buying up a lot of those properties down there, but how will the fiscal cliff affect investment going forward and maybe helping this recovery? because we're going to see a big increase in the capital gains taxes? >> that's right, it's going to have a bigger impact than i think analysts are predicting, maybe because they're numbers crunchers and not in the market. and fueling the momentum in the real estate markets, snapping up the foreclosure properties the last few years and the concern is they're going to be a little bit more conservative in their purchasing moving forward. and here is a
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)